If you want to know more about someone, you can always just ask the friend you have in common, which is a human touch that’s absent from most apps. Moreover, people can message you only if you’ve matched, so there are no unsolicited “greetings”. You can see what sort of relationship people are looking for, and while that doesn’t sound that revolutionary, it reflects the fact that Hinge carries more of a dating expectation than a just-hooking-up expectation à la Tinder. Furthermore, because of the friends-of-friends connection, you’re less likely to run across inappropriate photos. That’s a plus in our book.
The timer is designed to encourage contact, and some people really do appreciate that feature. But if you're someone who procrastinates, Bumble may not be for you. Also because women must message first, Bumble tends to weed out the slightly more insecure males. However the rate of overly confident males tends to be higher than I've seen on other apps. Bumble also has a BFF feature, but that's really not the focus of a dating app gallery, so I'll save it for another time. 

OK, so it’s time to get serious with this one. The personality test on EliteSingles asks questions about how you look physically and what you’re like as a person. Are you tidy? Patient? Positive? Honest? And what is it you’re looking for? Don’t worry, you can answer the questions on a scale, rather than a hard and fast yes or no, so you can hedge your bets. It’s a pretty thorough matching process which is intended to weed out any duds, but make a cuppa and get comfy as it can take up to 25 minutes to complete.
"People didn’t have mobile phones and laptops, and the process was people would go home, log on slowly, see who had written to them and write back," she says. "The courtship process was a lot slower, so it took quite a while to get from the first interaction to actually going on a date. Plus in those days, there was a stigma associated with online dating. You did not tell people you met your spouse, or partner, or even a date online."
OkCupid is one of the most popular dating apps out there. You've probably heard of this one before. It boasts over 40 million people although we're not sure how many of those are daily active users. It uses a more traditional dating site method. It'll ask you a bunch of questions and try to find matches based on similar interests. It also has some more modern dating apps features, like swiping away profiles you want or don't want. It'll ask you to subscribe to a monthly payment plan to unlock all the good features. The app has some strict, ambiguous rules about some things and the app itself is occasionally slow and buggy. Otherwise, it's actually not half bad.

One new dating scene app caters specifically to queer women. HER, available for free in both the Apple App Store and Google Play, serves as a place where female-identified and non-binary people can connect to find both friends and dates. You can sign up using your Facebook or Instagram account and swipe through profiles to find people in your area. The app is also a place to coordinate and find queer events like parties and meetups. User profiles show you photos, names, a person's sexual preference and physical attributes. Much like Tinder, once you match with a person, you can chat in the app's messaging component.


How does it work? This is sold as a serious online dating site for ‘discerning singles.’ A bit like eHarmony, PARSHIP uses a patented test, this time called The PARSHIP principle®, which analyses 32 personality traits and is based on an algorithm of 136 rules. It sounds complicated, but that’s not for you to worry about. Just sign up, do the test and get chatting to all those love-compatible people out there.
Hinge profiles have a good balance of photos versus personality, making it the most relationship-oriented app. It's my favorite app, but I have a lot of difficulty landing a date. I air my frustrations to ELLE.com news editor Alyssa Bailey, who met her boyfriend on Tinder. "Did I tell you I used to have all my dating apps in a folder called Hell?" she says.
Seeking long term commitment requires both your time and emotional investment. The first step to online dating is establishing clear preference of what you’re searching for in a partner. This way, you can identify exactly what qualities you’re seeking in someone. It is subsequently important to select a serious dating site when trying to find love online; a dating site (with a great dating app!) that allows you to clearly define your priorities for your next relationship. A site like us.
Unlike other dating websites, Zoosk requires you to upload a photo, and it can integrate information from your other social networking accounts to create your profile. As a nonpaying member, you can purchase “coins” to spend on additional features such as boosting your profile in search rankings, or sending virtual gifts. Also, while free members can browse, wink, and respond to emails they receive, they cannot initiate emails. However, upgrading to premium status allows you to chat and send emails to any other members. Premium status costs $29.95 for one month, $19.95 per month for a three-month subscription, or $9.99 per month for a full year.

Pitched at a slightly older, more professional crowd than many other dating apps (our average member age is 30-55), EliteSingles is a great fit for those who want to add love to their list of success. With high levels of education (91% of Canadian users are educated to Bachelor's degree level or higher); and a wide range of professions, EliteSingles members are interesting, dynamic people who are united by their desire to find a truly compatible match. 
Match is one of the most famous online dating sites, and for good reason. Running since 1995, Match really knows what it's doing in terms of pairing people looking for love and offering an extremely smooth user experience. While many singles these days opt for hookup apps and jumping from fling to fling, for those truly seeking committed relationships, Match is one of the best options for you.
Free sites generally offer more flexibility for different types of relationships, including casual hookups and same-sex relationships. In fact, they’re not even exclusively for dating, as OkCupid allows you to be married or in a relationship but looking for friends. Free sites may also work better for individuals who are separated, but not yet divorced (or separated with no immediate intention to divorce).

You can only add photos of yourself from Facebook or Instagram, though, which is kind of limiting if you’re not very active on either. Also, while the friends-of-friends concept has a lot of benefits, it’s also restricting. It’s possible to run out of matches after 10 minutes of browsing, which is a letdown if you’re actually enjoying the app or are serious about finding a date.

Dating is frustrating, exciting, awkward, and funny as hell. But more than anything, it's a learning experience of what you like, don't like, and are willing to endure—and for that I'm grateful. And when all hope is lost with a date and you find yourself hiding in a bathroom, or completely zoning out, or ghosting, at least you've got a good story to tell.
The League is an "elite dating app" that requires you to apply to get access. Your job title and the college you attended are factors The League considers when you apply, which is why you have to provide your Linkedin account. Big cities tend to have long waiting lists, so you might find yourself twiddling your thumbs as your application goes through the process. (Of course, you can pay to hurry up the review.) The exclusivity can be a draw for some and a turnoff for others. Let me demystify the app for you: I've seen most of the profiles I come across on The League on other dating apps. So at the end of the day, you'll probably see the same faces on Tinder, if you aren't deemed elite enough for The League.

Match has a free version, but the general consensus is that you need a paid subscription to have any luck on it. That's a hangover from the early days of online dating, when paying for membership to a site meant you were serious about settling down. But my friends and I have long since come to the conclusion that you might be a little too eager to find a significant other if you're paying to get dates, particularly given the abundance of free dating apps. There are definitely paid features on some dating apps that are worth the price, but I've yet to be able to justify shelling out cash for love. 


The experts say: For those who are at a loss as how to sell themselves in 500 words or less, this site offers the opportunity to be described by your friend. It works on the premise your friend can sell you better than you can but they can also embarrass you too. MSF has a more chatty style in the profile and gives you a greater insight into your potential date’s world.
×