Online dating is really popular. Using the internet is really popular. A survey conducted in 2013 found that 77% of people considered it “very important” to have their smartphones with them at all times. With the rise and rise of apps like Tinder (and the various copycat models) who could blame them.  If you want to think about dating as a numbers game (and apparently many people do), you could probably swipe left/right between 10 – 100 times in the span of time that it would take you to interact with one potential date in ‘real-life’.
There's even a specialized app for creative people looking to meet other artists and creators. Raya is free to download but then becomes membership-based. First, you fill out an application, which is then reviewed by a committee of people and an algorithm. You may be put on a waitlist for a short time while your application is reviewed. Once you're accepted, you need to sign up for a one-, three- or six-month auto-renewing membership plan. As a member, you also have to agree to a code of conduct in an effort to keep interactions respectful and cordial. As the website puts it, it believes using technology to meet someone should feel safe and exciting. Because of its exclusivity, the app has become well-known for its famous users. We weren't able to get a membership, but several blogs and reviews circulating online claim the app has been used by the likes of Cara Delevingne, Ruby Rose and Demi Lovato. 

And guess what? These tried and true algorithms don't require some long, tedious questionnaire. Aside from asking about your personal values and interests, Match allows you to specify what you want (or don't want) in a partner and how important that is: If you'd prefer someone who doesn't smoke cigarettes but it's not a deal breaker, Match lets you specify that, and if you choose "This is a deal breaker," they won't give you potential matches that had that in their answers. It's a super simple way to make sure you two at least somewhat on the same page with surface-level things, and can avoid those awkward conversations two months into the relationship. Finding someone who has the same values as you is just as important as finding an honest person and the rest of that mushy stuff.
With the right approach, a tried-and-true strategy, and an open heart and mind, finding love online can be fun, not stressful. To make it even easier for you, we’ve researched, tested and tried each of the top dating apps to give you the best insight on what to expect. From industry legend Match to international favorite Zoosk, consider this your official guide to finding love online.
With so many people now turning to online dating, all kinds of different dating services have now becoming available, catering for different expectations and requirements. Some dating sites are still for singles who are looking for some entertainment and excitement; others are for men and women whose aim is to meet someone who will become a long-term partner -- perhaps a husband or wife. Services in the latter category can reasonably be described as relationship sites. An outstanding example of a relationship site is PARSHIP, with its matching based on a scientific compatibility test, which draws on more than 30 years of scientific research.
Founder and CEO of Bumble, White Wolfe Herd, is also a Tinder co-founder, but left Tinder after two years and eventually sued the company in a sexual harassment lawsuit. In part, this and the rampant offensive messages by men became the inspiration for the ladies first system that Bumble uses. Herd calls Bumble a feminist dating app, and it 2017 the app boasted a whopping 22 million people on its service.
"People didn’t have mobile phones and laptops, and the process was people would go home, log on slowly, see who had written to them and write back," she says. "The courtship process was a lot slower, so it took quite a while to get from the first interaction to actually going on a date. Plus in those days, there was a stigma associated with online dating. You did not tell people you met your spouse, or partner, or even a date online."

While technically a free site, PlentyofFish offers you the option to purchase a membership upgrade. This allows you to find out who’s viewed your profile, find out if your messages were read or deleted, browse ad-free, send unlimited gifts, and increase your profile’s traffic. Upgrading costs $35.40 for three months, $51.00 for six months, or $81.40 for one year.
OkCupid has as many downsides as Tinder, and fewer positive ones, with the exception of learning a lot more about your potential dating partners. The interface is extremely clunky and the photos are a little small. You also have to tap on a user’s small image to see a larger version and the person’s profile, which is simply too large for an app. It works on a website, but it’s overkill on an app, and the amount of scrolling required makes it annoying to access. When you exit back to the list, there’s no guarantee that it’ll be in the same order or that it will return you to the spot you scrolled down to, making it extremely hard to keep track of what you’ve already viewed.

I was on Clover for quite some time but had forgotten it even existed until I started to throw this list together. I felt like it was a less successful hybrid of OkCupid and Tinder, and I also felt like the user base was pretty small, even though I live in an urban area with plenty of people who use a wide variety of dating apps. Clover says it has nearly 6 million users, 85 percent of whom are between the ages of 18 and 30.

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