Plenty of Fish is an online match-making app for singles with very active user database. They get about 3000000+ daily active users. P.O.F is pretty popular around the globe and hence they’ve 9 different languages for their huge audience. You can get started with P.O.F without having to authenticate with Facebook account, making it a Tinder like app. The text messaging is completely free, you don’t don’t have to pay just for messaging people.


As you might have guessed from the name, coffee beans are the currency of Coffee Meets Bagel, and you earn them through daily logins and other activities. The site is very reward-driven, giving you a limited number of matches each day, based first on the mutual friends you share on Facebook, with the number of matches increasing each consecutive day you log on. With the extra beans you accumulate, you can show interest in another group of potential matches who aren't necessarily your handpicked matches of the day, but with whom you may share common interests. The concept of matching people based on mutual friends isn't new, but because of how the dating platform is designed, it simply works well — as in, without being creepy or overly forward. 
Similar to other traditional players, OKCupid has in-depth user bios, but profile building isn't long or tedious at all — the questions are smart (and not mushy) and they're genuinely fun to answer. It does use swiping like Tinder, but you have a lot more to go off of than a lame bio and a selfie. You'll even get to see the percentage of how much you have in common based on question answers (and how much you don't). Speaking of questions, OkCupid has some that you won't see anywhere else: The same-sex couple ads are an obvious giveaway, but OkCupid has snuck in questions to weed out more conservative-minded people as a way to tell right off the bat if your potential match leans left or right. (It's not perfect, but it'll help meeting in person go a lot smoother.) Liberal ladies found that this worked to their advantage, as OkCupid released statistics showing that liberal-leaning answers to those questions made you 80% more likely to find love on the site. The entire site's ethos is built around numbers, and it's nice to know they can actually back up their algorithms. 
“I’d been on dating apps like Tinder and Bumble for four years and I didn’t have any luck,” says Jill Cimorelli, a social media influencer who lives in Los Angeles. “Eight months ago I tried Hinge, which limits the number of matches because it connects you with people you have mutual connections with [from Facebook and other social media platforms.]"
With so many options, it can be hard to know where to find the best crop of potential mates. Each of the dating apps out there has features that will matter differently to you depending on your lifestyle, what you want, and what's most important to you. Looking for Mrs. Right? Or perhaps just Mr. Right Now? It's helpful to know how each dating app is different so that you're surrounding yourself with people who want the same thing as you.

All options, including those for accessing the settings and viewing profiles, are located in a slide-out menu. Tap the “matches” option to browse, which, oddly, does not show you the people you’ve matched with but rather the people you could potentially match with. If that interface is too chaotic for you, tap the “quickmatch” option, which restricts the results to photos only. You can like people or message them in a similar fashion to Tinder, but messaging is your better bet: Users can see who has liked them only if they have upgraded to “A-list” status.
I was on Clover for quite some time but had forgotten it even existed until I started to throw this list together. I felt like it was a less successful hybrid of OkCupid and Tinder, and I also felt like the user base was pretty small, even though I live in an urban area with plenty of people who use a wide variety of dating apps. Clover says it has nearly 6 million users, 85 percent of whom are between the ages of 18 and 30.
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