For many modern daters, the name “Tinder" should be accompanied by the Darth Vader theme song. The truth is, no app embodies the “necessary evil” aspect of swiping the way Tinder does. And it’s not even Tinder’s fault: As a pioneer of the current dating app format, Tinder’s utter ubiquity means everyone has an opinion about it. And because, as we've established, the dating rigamarole kind of sucks in general, that means a lot of people have negative opinions about it. But you have to hand it to Tinder, they really did change the game (for better or worse).
Bumble is a happy bubble of dating zen. Built to be safe and respectful of everyone, the app feels far more up to date than its competition, with modern language. For example, it asks you how you identify instead of just making you check a "male" or "female" box. It also puts all the power in the woman's hands—a man can't contact a woman unless she has shown interest in him first. Not looking for love? Bumble also offers a way to find new friends, and even a mini-LinkedIn-like section for professional connections.
Damien has a "keep it 100" mentality, offering sage wisdom such as, "Money can't buy happiness." He's a designer at a popular clothing company and asks a lot of questions about my job. I answer, but he continues to press on the subject. "How do you know who your consumer is?" he quizzes me. "What kind of data do you use?" Our date starts to feel like an informational interview.

The thing is, there won't ever be some one-size-fits-all dating app that everyone loves and totally works: The point of these apps is to connect people, and people are sloppy. But out of all the tech that's pushed on us at all times, it’s nice to know there are some apps out there that even the bitterest-about-dating among us can find some good in.

Damien has a "keep it 100" mentality, offering sage wisdom such as, "Money can't buy happiness." He's a designer at a popular clothing company and asks a lot of questions about my job. I answer, but he continues to press on the subject. "How do you know who your consumer is?" he quizzes me. "What kind of data do you use?" Our date starts to feel like an informational interview.


You can only add photos of yourself from Facebook or Instagram, though, which is kind of limiting if you’re not very active on either. Also, while the friends-of-friends concept has a lot of benefits, it’s also restricting. It’s possible to run out of matches after 10 minutes of browsing, which is a letdown if you’re actually enjoying the app or are serious about finding a date.

Have you ever crossed paths with a stranger and felt an immediate connection? Have you always regretted not introducing yourself to that cute guy in the elevator or that really funny waitress? Happn is a dating app that gives you a second chance with missed connections. Every time you cross paths with another person who has the app on their phone, you'll be able to view their dating profile. You can also see how many times you've crossed paths with a person and if you don't want to match with them, you can simply remove that profile from your timeline. If you've found someone you'd like to get to know more you can like them with the app's heart button, and if the feeling is mutual, you'll be able to message back and forth.
Online dating is really popular. Using the internet is really popular. A survey conducted in 2013 found that 77% of people considered it “very important” to have their smartphones with them at all times. With the rise and rise of apps like Tinder (and the various copycat models) who could blame them.  If you want to think about dating as a numbers game (and apparently many people do), you could probably swipe left/right between 10 – 100 times in the span of time that it would take you to interact with one potential date in ‘real-life’.
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