Why it's awesome: Plenty of Fish, sometime styled as POF, boasts 4 million daily active users, with 65,000 new users each day, apparently, and claims users send 1 billion messages per month. After registering for POF, hopeful daters take a personality test that then helps POF determine what they call, "Your Relationship Needs." Basically, it's a way to make sure users know what they want from their love lives, and to ensure that it serves users other profiles that meet that criteria. One unusual quirk: The site recently launched a feature that allows users to message others through Google Home. Says Spira: "They have a large user base, are a free site, and are very popular."
New studies have found that one in five Americans have participated in an open sexual relationship. That suggests that millions of people are dipping their toes into the polyamorous lifestyle. So, where do these people live? OpenMinded.com recently revealed that 14.06 percent of its 105,600 U.S. members lived in the Sunshine State of California, making […]
Features for introverts: Instead of swiping, browsing, poking, and messaging your way into someone's inbox only to never hear back, this app will send you a potential match every day at noon. Men receive curated matches based on the algorithm and women will only be presented with potential matches (called Bagels) that have already expressed interest. 
How often are you put off by being spotted by the man in IT or adding facts like your surname, job or 4 filtered (it's okay, we all do it) photos for everyone to see? With Pickable women reveal themselves to men they're interested in. For the men? They get a fun dashboard to gamify the experience and give them better feedback in future. This could be a game changer.
Here's how it works: Your nosey friend will sign you up for the app and then starts promoting you like they're a damn salesman. When they find someone they deem fit, they'll swipe right. If the potential match's wingman agrees, you and your blind date will be automatically connected, and the helpful friends are booted from the conversation. There's even a leader board for multiple friends to compete to see who has the best matchmaking skills, so it really is fun for the whole group. It has an insanely good rating on the App Store, which is rare for a dating app. 
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While this is the only app of its kind we know if right now, we can only assume other high tech fridges will be coming out with their own versions soon. Samsung's website details the many ways in which the kinds of food you have speak volumes about your personality. A fridge full of protein shakes and fruits, for example, speaks to a healthy lifestyle. Someone with a lot of dairy products and containers full of sweets might really enjoy baking. These are aspects of a person’s life important when it comes to finding a long term partner, but we have to admit, it might be a little weird looking through fridges. Let us know how it goes.
Beca, 30, lives in Atlanta and says she "tried and failed at Tinder forever." For her, the choosiness with which Coffee Meets Bagel forces you to approach dating is actually the draw. "The limited amount of daily swipes made me more thoughtful and deliberate with the app," she says. "I much prefer it to apps like Tinder—where you can swipe matches while your friend is in the bar bathroom—when it comes to looking for long-term partners. You have to be much more intentional." She met her now-boyfriend on Coffee Meets Bagel.
Who it's for: People who don't know what they want. Zoosk's algorithm takes your preferences into its own hands and suggests matches based on how you swipe — even if you have no idea why you liked or didn't like that person. Zoosk offers ease, practicality, and a clean layout, and is a good bet if you haven't had any luck on the Tinders or eharmonies of the world.
Why it's awesome: Grindr has been the go-to for gay and bi men since 2009, and that's because finding someone to talk to is damn near instantaneous. Instead of swiping right or left to match, you'll get a borderline infinite collage of people who are close location wise — and aside from it being overwhelming and slightly frightening, it's obvious that there are a ton of men out there waiting for a conversation. Most users just looking to hook up will let you know right off that they're not trying to make small talk. That's not to say it's not for relationships — one of my good friends met his current boyfriend on Grindr — but at the surface level, it's ideal for quick, casual encounters. However, in 2017, Grindr launched their thoughtful LGBTQ online magazine called Into, in efforts to make itself look more like a lifestyle brand and less like a hookup app. According to Mashable's MJ Franklin, Into is one of the most interesting digital magazines on the internet. Now you really can say you're just on Grindr for the articles. (Suuure.)
Since our last round of testing, the dating app Hinge has gained lots of popularity. Founded in 2012, it's similar to Tinder but emphasizes matching you with people you share Facebook friends with. Once you’re out of Facebook connections, you start seeing potential matches you have fewer friends in common with. You're able to see each user's job, educational background, physical traits and a short biography. Scroll through users and select the ones you'd like to get to know better. If that user likes you back, you're connected via the app's messaging platform.

Just like traditional dating sites, dating apps range from platonic friend finders to hook-up enablers. Depending on what you want to get out of your dating app, we suggest playing the field a little bit. Most apps are free, so it doesn’t hurt to set up a Tinder profile and a Coffee Meets Bagel profile to get a feel for what you like. If you’re already set up on a desktop dating site, see if there’s an app available -- even the paid sites typically offer a free app to go along with the desktop component.
Traditional Internet dating can be challenging for those singles looking for love that lasts - but eHarmony is not a traditional dating site. Of all the single men or women you may meet online, very few will be compatible with you specifically, and it can be difficult to determine the level of compatibility of a potential partner through methods of conventional dating services – browsing classified ads, online personals, or viewing profile photos. Our Compatibility Matching System does the work for you by narrowing the field from thousands of single prospects to match you with a select group of compatible matches with whom you can build a quality relationship.

If you think you're too old to exercise your thumb, think again. Millennials aren't the only ones who are dating digitally right now. Studies indicate that there are two major growing demographics when it comes to online dating: people under 25, and people over 50. How come? Well, look no further than marriage statistics, as people on average enter a first marriage around age 28, and given the divorce rate, often become single again later in life. In fact, a recent report indicated that while only 6 percent of Golden Year singles confessed to having online dating profiles in 2013, that number has doubled over the past five years, now teetering around 12 percent and growing. As mobile phones and tablets become more user-friendly for all ages, the barriers that might have once prevented silver bachelors from swiping no longer apply.
Hate anything from slow walkers, to Donald Trump, cargo shorts, the phrase "Live. Laugh. Love," you name it — you know, all of the important stuff that keeps a relationship going. The app is aesthetically pleasing and clearly caters toward a younger, hip crowd, and it's only a matter of time before cynical millennials become obsessed with it. Unfortunately, not a ton of people know about it yet, meaning many of your matches will be far AF away — so if you're looking for a relationship that goes deeper than bitching about something, you might want to use an app with a more robust user base for now. Even with a lack of people, the premise is just too good to pass up. If you download it now, you'll be able to say "I was on that five months ago," when everyone else finds out about it — and you know people hate not being the first to like something.
Bumble is a happy bubble of dating zen. Built to be safe and respectful of everyone, the app feels far more up to date than its competition, with modern language. For example, it asks you how you identify instead of just making you check a "male" or "female" box. It also puts all the power in the woman's hands—a man can't contact a woman unless she has shown interest in him first. Not looking for love? Bumble also offers a way to find new friends, and even a mini-LinkedIn-like section for professional connections.
Since our last round of testing, the dating app Hinge has gained lots of popularity. Founded in 2012, it's similar to Tinder but emphasizes matching you with people you share Facebook friends with. Once you’re out of Facebook connections, you start seeing potential matches you have fewer friends in common with. You're able to see each user's job, educational background, physical traits and a short biography. Scroll through users and select the ones you'd like to get to know better. If that user likes you back, you're connected via the app's messaging platform.
The experts say: For those who are at a loss as how to sell themselves in 500 words or less, this site offers the opportunity to be described by your friend. It works on the premise your friend can sell you better than you can but they can also embarrass you too. MSF has a more chatty style in the profile and gives you a greater insight into your potential date’s world.
Features for introverts: The SmartPick can really be your best friend, serving as the best icebreaker.  If both you and someone you're interested in both vote "yes" on each other's profiles, the SmartPick feature will let you know the good news by email and shoot you a message in your Zoosk inbox. Another good option is the Super Send feature, which could help eliminate the scary feeling from being the one to make the first move. Choose a message to break the ice, then allow Zoosk to blast it out for you using Super Send. If someone indicates they're interested by writing back, then you get to view each other's profiles.
Have you ever crossed paths with a stranger and felt an immediate connection? Have you always regretted not introducing yourself to that cute guy in the elevator or that really funny waitress? Happn is a dating app that gives you a second chance with missed connections. Every time you cross paths with another person who has the app on their phone, you'll be able to view their dating profile. You can also see how many times you've crossed paths with a person and if you don't want to match with them, you can simply remove that profile from your timeline. If you've found someone you'd like to get to know more you can like them with the app's heart button, and if the feeling is mutual, you'll be able to message back and forth.
But what is it about Tinder in particular that appeals to millennials? "Raised on video games and coming of age during social media, it's not surprising that the average millennial gets bored easily and can have a short attention span — [and] Tinder is ideal for this," Jonathan Bennett, dating/relationship expert at Double Trust Dating, tells Bustle. "After all, you don't need to wade through someone's life history to find them attractive. Tinder gives you the essentials and you can make a choice from there."
Badoo has a little bit of everything. It’s formatted like Tinder (but with more profile), it tells you if you’ve crossed paths like happn and you can use it for friends or dating like Bumble. It also has over 300 million users between its website and its app, which means a large dating pool, but also more scammers and fake accounts. Beware of that model who’s so into you.
If dating apps are supposed to take the headache out of trying to meet someone, it's not a good sign that so many daters consider them a necessary evil at best and just plain evil at worst. Iliza Shlesinger, in her new Netflix special, Elder Millennial, has a bit about online dating. “I don’t like to tell people how we met,” she says of her fiancé. "It’s not bad, it’s not embarrassing, it’s just not cool: We met on a dating app, like all of you. We met on a dating app and it’s less a product of my creativity and more a product of my generation. I’m a millennial and that’s how we meet each other.” (The special is funny and you should watch it.)

Specify Relationship Type. One of the best features of PlentyofFish is that it allows you to specify exactly which type of relationship you’re looking for, from a hookup, to friends, to casual dating, to a long-term relationship, to marriage. The site matches you up based on a variety of factors, such as location, interests, and even your browsing history – this means that if you input that you are looking for someone in his or her 40s, but are browsing people in their 20s, both will show up as matches for you. 
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Bumble is one of those dating apps that tries to shake things up. It'll match you like normal. However, women get to initiate chats first. She'll have 24 hours to do so and then the man will have 24 hours to reciprocate. In homosexual matches, either one can go first. Many have touted this as a way to weed out creepy people. However, we couldn't verify that one way or the other and it makes things a little difficult for male users. The app does, in fact, show you possible matches and it gives you the opportunity to talk to new people. It has problems, but it's still a cut above a lot of others. We do like it for non-straight people, though, since they do get the classic dating experience without any bottlenecks.
You don’t have to enter every single details which makes it very easy-going option. After signing up you might be taken to the membership upgrade page which offers Cell phone texting, Private Friend Photos, and Get Action Guarantee, i.e., you’ll get a month of free membership if you’re not satisfied with their paid service. In the free version you will face pop-ups. We also heard that some people had issues with payment so we would recommend you to be careful and stick to the free version.

For our fake dating profiles, we counted how many matches and messages we received in 24 hours. We also noted whether you could block or report inappropriate behavior, how long the profile setup process was, how in-depth setup questions were, and whether we encountered any obvious bots (fake profiles like ours). For sites that require you to “like” users to get matches, we did so to the first 30 accounts we came across.


Never mind the fact that more than one-third of all people who use online dating sites have never actually gone on a date with someone they met online, those that somehow do manage to find someone else they are willing to marry AND who is willing to marry them (a vanishingly tiny subset of online daters) face an uphill battle. According to research conducted at Michigan State University, relationships that start out online are 28% more likely to break down in their first year, than relationships where the couples first met face-to-face. And it gets worse. Couples who met online are nearly 3 times as likely to get divorced as couples that met face-to-face.
For our fake dating profiles, we counted how many matches and messages we received in 24 hours. We also noted whether you could block or report inappropriate behavior, how long the profile setup process was, how in-depth setup questions were, and whether we encountered any obvious bots (fake profiles like ours). For sites that require you to “like” users to get matches, we did so to the first 30 accounts we came across.
Your message history will disappear after a weak. This concept may annoy you but it forces you to either move on or meet personally. If you want be in touch with the bagel then you can share a link of any of your social media profile like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or whatever social media platform you use. The downside of this app is that, it brings you matches based on the friend list of your Facebook friends, so it’s possible that you might get a match from people you don’t like.
Most dating apps are fairly LGBTQ inclusive. Still, it's nice to have an app to call your own. Her is tailored to lesbian, bisexual and queer women. The app serves a valuable purpose, but generally has some bugs and glitches that made it frustrating for me to use. Most of my queer female friends have told me they found the app to be just OK, but they usually end up back on Tinder or Bumble. Still I checked it regularly for some time and had a few pleasant conversations with actual human beings. And isn't that all we're really looking for in a dating app?
There's even a specialized app for creative people looking to meet other artists and creators. Raya is free to download but then becomes membership-based. First, you fill out an application, which is then reviewed by a committee of people and an algorithm. You may be put on a waitlist for a short time while your application is reviewed. Once you're accepted, you need to sign up for a one-, three- or six-month auto-renewing membership plan. As a member, you also have to agree to a code of conduct in an effort to keep interactions respectful and cordial. As the website puts it, it believes using technology to meet someone should feel safe and exciting. Because of its exclusivity, the app has become well-known for its famous users. We weren't able to get a membership, but several blogs and reviews circulating online claim the app has been used by the likes of Cara Delevingne, Ruby Rose and Demi Lovato.
Taste buds is a unique and new dating app for music lovers. You can make an account on this app either using your Facebook account or email. The premise of this app is to get people connect who have the same interest in the music. Based on the music taste, you get potential matches. From there, things can get interesting just based on your music choice. The restrictions are limited since you can send and receive messages prior any match with the person.
Though the data surrounding the success of online dating is still new and ever-changing, some studies indicate meeting online paves the way for a happier relationship. Because swiping through profiles, striking up often long-winded conversations and connecting on mutual interests provides a different starting line, you naturally become pickier. Of course, this constant connection gives you the opportunity to explore what matters to you the most as you can always pick up your phone, find a date, and try it out again. Unlike when you'd try your luck at a dingy bar, nowadays, you can go through potential matches at your leisure, focusing your energy on those you deem promising without any pressure.
After signing up, Happn showed me 68 users it said I had crossed paths with in the preceding three hours, though I hadn't left my apartment all day. This might be helpful if you're looking to date your immediate neighbors (or Uber drivers), but I don't see the attraction when competitors like Tinder already show the distance between you and other users. Frankly, if I saw a cute guy in a coffee shop, I'd just approach him rather than check to see if he's on Happn. The app seems designed for people who don't want to use online dating but who also don't want to approach people in real life. Pick a lane.
Bumble works on a similar basis to Tinder. It's free, easy to set up and simple to use, and a right swipe indicates a like. A key difference, however, is that women have to begin the conversation, thus avoiding the countless cringey messages of Tinder. There's also a 24-hour time limit to start chatting, so if you find your soulmate you'd better move quickly. 
Match.com has a free version, but the general consensus is that you'll need a paid subscription to have any luck. That's a hangover from the early days of online dating, when paying for membership to a site meant you were serious about settling down. But my friends and I have long since come to the conclusion that you might be a little too eager to find a significant other if you're paying to get dates, particularly given the abundance of free dating apps. There are definitely paid features on some dating apps that are worth the price, but I've yet to be able to justify shelling out cash for love. 
There's really only one path to finding other singles on the site: swipe, message, and go from there. The main section of the site, the swiping section, allows you to swipe on profiles extremely quickly, with many users only looking at the main profile picture before swiping one way or the other. There are some more advanced paid features that let you “boost” your swipe, such as super-liking a member, or reverse your swipe option and go back to a profile you accidentally passed on. Communication can only take place once both members like each other, at which time either match may initiate a conversation.
If you think you're too old to exercise your thumb, think again. Millennials aren't the only ones who are dating digitally right now. Studies indicate that there are two major growing demographics when it comes to online dating: people under 25, and people over 50. How come? Well, look no further than marriage statistics, as people on average enter a first marriage around age 28, and given the divorce rate, often become single again later in life. In fact, a recent report indicated that while only 6 percent of Golden Year singles confessed to having online dating profiles in 2013, that number has doubled over the past five years, now teetering around 12 percent and growing. As mobile phones and tablets become more user-friendly for all ages, the barriers that might have once prevented silver bachelors from swiping no longer apply.
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