JSwipe is a Jewish dating app. You upload photos of yourself and scroll through other user profiles in the hopes of matching. This app is unique in that your matches expire in 18 days, so you've got to start chatting and schedule a date quickly. Everything is free to use but you can pay extra for "super swipes" to show a person you're extremely interested in them. This is a location-based app, so it's likely to work best in large cities.

Hinge may seem like it plays second-fiddle to the likes of Tinder, but it has a pretty elite user base (99 percent of its daters went to college, for example). Hinge’s CEO compared his app to Facebook, versus Tinder’s Myspace—sometimes for interface reasons (Hinge is aimed at the college-educated set) and sometimes for class reasons (much has been written on the ways dating app algorithms may favor white people).

Match.com has a free version, but the general consensus is that you'll need a paid subscription to have any luck. That's a hangover from the early days of online dating, when paying for membership to a site meant you were serious about settling down. But my friends and I have long since come to the conclusion that you might be a little too eager to find a significant other if you're paying to get dates, particularly given the abundance of free dating apps. There are definitely paid features on some dating apps that are worth the price, but I've yet to be able to justify shelling out cash for love. 
One of the better-known gay and lesbian dating apps, HER is a top option for queer women (and womxn) seeking a Tinder-style dating app that's exclusively focused on the LGBTQI+ experience. In its previous incarnation, it was known as Dattch; as HER the app's aim is to be a more-inclusive queer dating hub. Yet, with initial matching based on liking photos from a grid of nearby users, those seeking a serious relationship will have to be ok with asking questions to see if there's a personality connection.8

The format is simple. Each featured dater takes part in a question-and-answer livestream on the first night, where they introduce themselves and take questions from the viewing contestants. The next night sees the games begin, and the contestants are asked a series of multiple choice questions about the night before. Players who get all the questions right go on to the next round, where they’re asked a number of questions by the featured dater — who then narrows the field down to three contestants, based on their answers. Those final three choices then get the chance to impress their prospective date via live video by doing whatever it is they do best — whether that’s by busting some killer dance moves, telling jokes, or some other talent. The pair will then go on a date paid for by Quiz Date Live, which can range from hit Broadway shows, Michelin-star dining experiences, helicopter rides over Manhattan, or other luxurious dates.

Happn is a local dating app. It uses your GPS to find people close to you. It does so with varying degrees of success depending on where you live. Like most dating apps, this one won't do you any good if it's not a popular app in your area. Thus, if you don't get a ton of matches, you should probably give up on this one. The app works by showing you who you cross paths with in real life. Once it happens enough times, their profile shows up on your timeline. You can then connect and chat. This is a neat concept because you're automatically matched with people who are usually in the same kinds of areas you are and that can be a helpful ice breaker. You can buy coins as in-app purchases. Like Coffee Meets Bagel, they're useful for adding functionality and increasing your visibility to other users.

“After wasting many, many hours I have decided that I can’t do this to myself any more. I’ve decided if I’m not going to meet someone organically then I’m better off by myself instead of always wondering ‘What is wrong with me?’” says the Toronto executive who has tried eHarmony, Tinder, Plenty of Fish and Bumble. “When in fact, there is nothing wrong with me. You cannot detect chemistry via an app. You can’t get to know someone via text message.”
You can find the Elite Singles app in the App Store and on Google Play, and you won’t have to pay anything to download it, upload your information and photos, search through profiles, receive matches via an exclusive algorithm, and communicate in certain ways (e.g., send virtual winks). In addition to the lack of cost, Elite Singles is highly respected, particularly because over 80% of its members have a higher education degree such as a bachelor’s or master’s.
Happn is a local dating app. It uses your GPS to find people close to you. It does so with varying degrees of success depending on where you live. Like most dating apps, this one won't do you any good if it's not a popular app in your area. Thus, if you don't get a ton of matches, you should probably give up on this one. The app works by showing you who you cross paths with in real life. Once it happens enough times, their profile shows up on your timeline. You can then connect and chat. This is a neat concept because you're automatically matched with people who are usually in the same kinds of areas you are and that can be a helpful ice breaker. You can buy coins as in-app purchases. Like Coffee Meets Bagel, they're useful for adding functionality and increasing your visibility to other users.
Scams have been around as long as the internet (possibly even before…). Of course there are pitfalls and tripwires in every sphere of life, but this may be particularly true in the context of online dating. There are literally hundreds (if not thousands) of online scams, and I’m not going to run through any in detail here, but do some research before you go giving your bank details to ‘Nigerian princes’ promising ‘fun moments’. As a matter of fact, you should probably be wary of any person, group or entity asking for any kind of financial or personal information. It might even be advisable to follow these general guidelines:

Like their desktop site, the Match.com dating app is designed for those seeking lasting relationships. It employs a mixture of matchmaking and profile searching, which means you'll see many faces on this site. It also rewards interaction, basing some matches on how much you interact with certain types of profiles -  so if you have the time to click your favourites, you'll be rewarded.1 
Why it's awesome: When we're blinded by love, we tend to ignore red flags and can't see when someone is all wrong for us — but friends can see it clear as day and wish we would just take their damn advice. Wingman is the unique take on dating that lets your friends play cupid, essentially making it the dating app version of the "Have you met my friend?" classic bar line. Your friends want to see you get laid (or find love, obviously) as badly as you do, and sometimes, they just know us better than we know ourselves. As Mashable's Cassie Murdoch writes, "...a little bit like handing your friend your Tinder or Bumble account and saying, 'Here, you deal with this.'" And sometimes, fancy algorithms just aren't enough.
About Blog Ask Vicki is an advice column blog run by Vicki Matthews ND. Vicki is an author, teacher, and naturopathic physician who is passionate about using ancient wisdom to re-establish balance at all levels of life. Relationship Remedies Using the Five Elements offers a simple yet profound approach to getting along better with anyone, whether with friend, colleague, child, spouse, or neighbor.
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