No matter what you’re looking for—casual hookups, marriage, polyamory, relationships with men, relationships with women, a little bit of everything—OkCupid can accommodate. Two factors really set OkCupid apart from the competition: It produces the best profiles, and it uses the best matching algorithm that pops the most promising profiles to the top that are more likely to be robust, human, and charming.
But she says, that doesn’t mean it’s the only way to meet someone. “Ultimately, I don’t think we should have an all-or-nothing approach when it comes to meeting new people. When we’re single and looking for a partner, we have to cast a wide net. If you feel dating fatigue from going on too many blind dates, I suggest taking a break and re-engaging in activities you enjoy."
It doesn't cater just for the LGBTQI+ community, but OKCupid is an inclusive app with many non-binary profile options (you can choose from 13 orientations and 22 gender identities). It's also not afraid to get political: users can get badges that show support for organizations like Planned Parenthood or the ACLU. For some singles, this is a drawcard, while for others it may feel like it's breaking the politics and dating taboo.10
Bumble is a happy bubble of dating zen. Built to be safe and respectful of everyone, the app feels far more up to date than its competition, with modern language. For example, it asks you how you identify instead of just making you check a "male" or "female" box. It also puts all the power in the woman's hands—a man can't contact a woman unless she has shown interest in him first. Not looking for love? Bumble also offers a way to find new friends, and even a mini-LinkedIn-like section for professional connections.
If you think you're too old to exercise your thumb, think again. Millennials aren't the only ones who are dating digitally right now. Studies indicate that there are two major growing demographics when it comes to online dating: people under 25, and people over 50. How come? Well, look no further than marriage statistics, as people on average enter a first marriage around age 28, and given the divorce rate, often become single again later in life. In fact, a recent report indicated that while only 6 percent of Golden Year singles confessed to having online dating profiles in 2013, that number has doubled over the past five years, now teetering around 12 percent and growing. As mobile phones and tablets become more user-friendly for all ages, the barriers that might have once prevented silver bachelors from swiping no longer apply.
Beca, 30, lives in Atlanta and says she "tried and failed at Tinder forever." For her, the choosiness with which Coffee Meets Bagel forces you to approach dating is actually the draw. "The limited amount of daily swipes made me more thoughtful and deliberate with the app," she says. "I much prefer it to apps like Tinder—where you can swipe matches while your friend is in the bar bathroom—when it comes to looking for long-term partners. You have to be much more intentional." She met her now-boyfriend on Coffee Meets Bagel.
Match has a free version, but the general consensus is that you need a paid subscription to have any luck on it. That's a hangover from the early days of online dating, when paying for membership to a site meant you were serious about settling down. But my friends and I have long since come to the conclusion that you might be a little too eager to find a significant other if you're paying to get dates, particularly given the abundance of free dating apps. There are definitely paid features on some dating apps that are worth the price, but I've yet to be able to justify shelling out cash for love. 

‘First date nerves are natural, but you can tackle them by employing a few confidence tricks. Visualise a great date – one where the conversation flows easily – and hold on to the positive feelings that the thought encourages. Affirmations are a useful tool too. Stand in front of the mirror, put your shoulders back, and say out loud ‘I can do this’. It may sound strange but it really works.’

Now has a messaging feature, but chats are only visible for two hours if you and another user stop talking. You get four free access keys when you sign up, which increase your chances of meeting new people. If you want more, they're available for purchase. When you buy a Gold Key, you get unlimited access to all of the app's premium features for 60 hours.


OkCupid is one of the most popular dating apps out there. You've probably heard of this one before. It boasts over 40 million people although we're not sure how many of those are daily active users. It uses a more traditional dating site method. It'll ask you a bunch of questions and try to find matches based on similar interests. It also has some more modern dating apps features, like swiping away profiles you want or don't want. It'll ask you to subscribe to a monthly payment plan to unlock all the good features. The app has some strict, ambiguous rules about some things and the app itself is occasionally slow and buggy. Otherwise, it's actually not half bad.
POF is definitely among the best dating apps on the list. It allows you to join for free, message people for free, and engage with the app for free. However, the idea that it bills itself as a free dating app is hogwash because you definitely have to pay money for more advanced features. Anyway, this one seems to work pretty well. The interface is clean and everything is simple to use. There are some issues here and there, but nothing too drastic. It works pretty well, at least for a dating app.
Bumble is a happy bubble of dating zen. Built to be safe and respectful of everyone, the app feels far more up to date than its competition, with modern language. For example, it asks you how you identify instead of just making you check a "male" or "female" box. It also puts all the power in the woman's hands—a man can't contact a woman unless she has shown interest in him first. Not looking for love? Bumble also offers a way to find new friends, and even a mini-LinkedIn-like section for professional connections.
Profiles are concise and settings are also pared down, like with Tinder, but swiping up allows you to scroll through additional photos instead of super-liking someone. This means that just because someone twitched their thumb up on your photo, you won’t have to see their profile first every time you open the app, even though you swipe left on their profile every time.
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