My experience has been similar to what has been experienced by many on online dating. One thing it can do is help others who or shy or introverted to take a chance and work on your communication or have to the nerve to start a conversation. It think that the marketing of these sites doesn't help as does ones expectations. I have only met a few women online and while it haven't had any success yet, I wouldn't have met them otherwise. From what I have observed is that people met their partner in all kinds of places like at a concert, a party, or other social settings. Sometimes people meet each other in volunteering or taking up courses. I have tried these ways as well, and while I haven't been successful, I have had a lot of fun. Whatever I do here has to at least be enjoyable and fun, because if it isn't, then why bother.
The problem with a lot of online dating applications is that they don’t really work. Many are just ‘fad’ applications that squeeze money from punters with no intention of matching you with a suitable partner. Before you throw caution to the wind and empty your wallet into the pockets of an online app with the reckless abandon of a love-struck teenager, there are a few things you should know.

What it'll cost you: For free, you get to create a profile and send unlimited winks. The full membership, however, that allows you to send and receive private messages, chat with the instant messenger, and see who's viewed your profile is $29.95 for 1 month, $19.99 per month for 3 months, $16.66 per month for 6 months, and $11.67 per month for a year. 
Before we get started, our blanket recommendation for everyone is to find the apps with a larger user base in your area. That helps ensure you get plenty of matches, and by extension, a higher chance of finding someone actually compatible with you. If you try one of the niche apps and don’t get results after a week or two, we recommend ditching it entirely for a more popular option. If all else fails, our best recommendation is Tinder because, as stated, it’s popular everywhere. Good luck!

Hinge is kind of like Tinder. OK, it’s a lot like Tinder — but with a few key differences that make it better. Interface-wise, it looks like Tinder’s younger sister. But function-wise, it relies more on your Facebook friends to make connections for you. Hinge connects you through friends-of-friends-of-friends and shows you not just the people you have in common, but all the interests you have in common. It does this by having you answer a bunch of questions through a Tinder-like interface. Have you been to Berlin? Swipe right. Don’t play croquet? Swipe left. This makes answering questions far easier and less time-consuming, not to mention more fun. The questions themselves aren’t as asinine as those in some other dating apps, and give you a better sense of someone than 500 characters might.


The experts say: For those who are at a loss as how to sell themselves in 500 words or less, this site offers the opportunity to be described by your friend. It works on the premise your friend can sell you better than you can but they can also embarrass you too. MSF has a more chatty style in the profile and gives you a greater insight into your potential date’s world.

Online dating is really popular. Using the internet is really popular. A survey conducted in 2013 found that 77% of people considered it “very important” to have their smartphones with them at all times. With the rise and rise of apps like Tinder (and the various copycat models) who could blame them.  If you want to think about dating as a numbers game (and apparently many people do), you could probably swipe left/right between 10 – 100 times in the span of time that it would take you to interact with one potential date in ‘real-life’.

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