Why it's awesome: Referred to as "Tinder for elites," The League is the dating app version of those really exclusive clubs that always have a line around the corner, terrifying bouncers, and a crazy cover. Okay, that kind of sounds like it's for assholes, but it's actually a comforting alternative if you're not trying to be thrown to the wolves like you would be on Match. ( The League CEO Amanda Bradford claims claims that it's actually a way for "alpha females" to find someone who celebrates and supports their drive.) It's overwhelming to skip past all of the sketchy randoms to get to the handful of good ones, and even then, they could totally be catfishing you. The League does the social media creeping for you, requires all users to connect a Facebook and LinkedIn account, and screens based on professional history to ensure that their dating pool is full of "intelligent, educated and ambitious" singles.

Most dating apps are fairly LGBTQ inclusive. Still, it's nice to have an app to call your own. Her is tailored to lesbian, bisexual and queer women. The app serves a valuable purpose, but generally has some bugs and glitches that made it frustrating for me to use. Most of my queer female friends have told me they found the app to be just OK, but they usually end up back on Tinder or Bumble. Still I checked it regularly for some time and had a few pleasant conversations with actual human beings. And isn't that all we're really looking for in a dating app?
The timer is designed to encourage contact, and some people really do appreciate that feature. But if you're someone who procrastinates, Bumble may not be for you. Also because women must message first, Bumble tends to weed out the slightly more insecure males. However the rate of overly confident males tends to be higher than I've seen on other apps. Bumble also has a BFF feature, but that's really not the focus of a dating app gallery, so I'll save it for another time. 
As this is 2019, all of these services, even the decades-old Match, offer both iPhone apps and Android Apps, but still have desktop counterparts for when you're at work and want to take a break from your spreadsheet to set up a weekend tryst. (Bumble is the one exception here.) Just be aware that the functionality can vary substantially between the app and desktop interfaces. For example, there's no swiping on Tinder's browser version.
The downside of online dating is the lack of face-to-face interaction, at least when you first start chatting with someone. This leaves users vulnerable to chat bots, or computer programs made to trick real users into thinking they’re interacting with a real person. These programs often attempt to steal credit card or other personal information from real people.
Features for introverts: You can really be yourself on OkCupid. Whether you're looking for the relationship of your dreams, a one-night stand, or a sham marriage (seriously, we’re not judging), OkCupid doesn't care unless you're being a jerk about it. On OkCupid, you’re more than just a photo, you can share stories, your passions, and pretty much anything else you want and feel totally at home. 
There's even a specialized app for creative people looking to meet other artists and creators. Raya is free to download but then becomes membership-based. First, you fill out an application, which is then reviewed by a committee of people and an algorithm. You may be put on a waitlist for a short time while your application is reviewed. Once you're accepted, you need to sign up for a one-, three- or six-month auto-renewing membership plan. As a member, you also have to agree to a code of conduct in an effort to keep interactions respectful and cordial. As the website puts it, it believes using technology to meet someone should feel safe and exciting. Because of its exclusivity, the app has become well-known for its famous users. We weren't able to get a membership, but several blogs and reviews circulating online claim the app has been used by the likes of Cara Delevingne, Ruby Rose and Demi Lovato.
Syrtash says most people still have the idea or dream of locking eyes with a potential mate and having immediate chemistry. “However, it should be noted that meeting someone through a dating site or app doesn’t mean the connection you have when you meet in person won’t be organic or real," she says. “The things we are looking for in a potential mate remain the same, but the ways in which we meet people today are certainly different."
About Blog A divorced, mother of two, who is a Psychiatric Nursing Instructor by day and blogger by night. I am funny, upfront, honest and raw blogging about divorce, dating, grief, trauma, heartbreak and mother to an Asperger's teen. I'm hoping by sharing my life you learn that you do matter, you are enough, you have strength, and you are worthy of love!
She’s just one of many dating app users who’ve grown dissatisfied with the mechanical exercise of swiping for love – an act that now feels as dispassionate as scrolling through Netflix. For these disillusioned daters, it feels as though the golden age of online dating has ended – even though the sector appears to be booming. The US$3-billion American dating industry has seen a 140-per-cent increase in revenue since 2009, according to IBISWorld. The market research firm counts approximately 55 million mobile dating app users in North America alone, and estimates that number will grow by 25 per cent next year.
If you want to know more about someone, you can always just ask the friend you have in common, which is a human touch that’s absent from most apps. Moreover, people can message you only if you’ve matched, so there are no unsolicited “greetings”. You can see what sort of relationship people are looking for, and while that doesn’t sound that revolutionary, it reflects the fact that Hinge carries more of a dating expectation than a just-hooking-up expectation à la Tinder. Furthermore, because of the friends-of-friends connection, you’re less likely to run across inappropriate photos. That’s a plus in our book.
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