A handsome dental student from LA, Sam chooses a bar in the East Village for our date, but it turns out to be too crowded, so we're forced to relocate. I settle in with a glass of wine and find out he’s driven, smart, and wants to be a dental influencer (!!!) on Instagram (in hindsight, this explains a lot). As he continues to extol the business potential of social media to me, a social media editor, he suddenly gets up from his side of the table and plops down next to me. Awkward! He asks how tall I am and it leads to a conversation on average heights in America.
@OttawaMorning Online Dating - my hubby & I met each other online through @eHarmonyCanada . He was just finishing his 3 month membership, I joined for 1 yr and met him in the 1st 3 weeks. LOL. We've known each other 10 years, married for 8. pic.twitter.com/PfC1EGuYs3
Changes in the last year have made OkCupid a bit more like Tinder, focusing more on swiping and eliminating the ability to message a user without matching with them first. You can still send a message -- it just won't show up in the recipient's inbox unless you match. Because who doesn't enjoy sending a thoughtful message to someone who might never see it? However, OkCupid has pointed out that these changes did help lower the number of offensive messages users received, which might be a worthwhile trade-off.
eHarmony is exclusively for users seeking long-term relationships, and subscribers must be single, widowed, or divorced – separated individuals are not allowed to set up a profile. While the eHarmony site allows only for opposite-sex matching, there is a companion site called Compatible Partners, which is for those seeking a long-term same-sex relationship. The cost of eHarmony in the U.S. is $59.95 for one month, $39.95 per month for a three-month subscription, $29.95 per month for six months, and $19.95 per month for 12 months.
One new dating scene app caters specifically to queer women. HER, available for free in both the Apple App Store and Google Play, serves as a place where female-identified and non-binary people can connect to find both friends and dates. You can sign up using your Facebook or Instagram account and swipe through profiles to find people in your area. The app is also a place to coordinate and find queer events like parties and meetups. User profiles show you photos, names, a person's sexual preference and physical attributes. Much like Tinder, once you match with a person, you can chat in the app's messaging component.

The app is free and there is no desktop version. You can purchase credits separately in the app or pay monthly for the premium version, which lacks any ads and lets you see who has liked you, among other features. It has 4.2 out of 5 stars in the Apple app store, and some user reviews note the app can be very confusing in busy urban areas, like New York City. We're guessing it's also not very effective in less populated rural areas, as it relies on a lot of people having the app on their phone. You can also play the app's built-in game CrushTime, which lets you guess who has liked you from four profiles you've recently crossed paths with.
The app is free and there is no desktop version. You can purchase credits separately in the app or pay monthly for the premium version, which lacks any ads and lets you see who has liked you, among other features. It has 4.2 out of 5 stars in the Apple app store, and some user reviews note the app can be very confusing in busy urban areas, like New York City. We're guessing it's also not very effective in less populated rural areas, as it relies on a lot of people having the app on their phone. You can also play the app's built-in game CrushTime, which lets you guess who has liked you from four profiles you've recently crossed paths with.
Dating apps don’t even have to limit you to your smartphone, either. Many desktop dating sites actually offer apps and vice-versa. This means you can sign on from your computer and reap the comfortable full-screen benefits of a dating site, but when your conversations and matches start coming in, you can take them with you when you leave the house -- no more restrictions.
If dating apps are supposed to take the headache out of trying to meet someone, it's not a good sign that so many daters consider them a necessary evil at best and just plain evil at worst. Iliza Shlesinger, in her new Netflix special, Elder Millennial, has a bit about online dating. “I don’t like to tell people how we met,” she says of her fiancé. "It’s not bad, it’s not embarrassing, it’s just not cool: We met on a dating app, like all of you. We met on a dating app and it’s less a product of my creativity and more a product of my generation. I’m a millennial and that’s how we meet each other.” (The special is funny and you should watch it.)
A massive 20% of relationships and over 17% of marriages start online and there are hundreds of apps that claim to put love in the palm of your hand. It doesn’t matter whether you’re desperate to choose matching PJs or you simply fancy a flirt, connecting to like-minded people has never been easier. Here’s the lowdown on 5 of the best dating apps around:

Online dating is really popular. Using the internet is really popular. A survey conducted in 2013 found that 77% of people considered it “very important” to have their smartphones with them at all times. With the rise and rise of apps like Tinder (and the various copycat models) who could blame them.  If you want to think about dating as a numbers game (and apparently many people do), you could probably swipe left/right between 10 – 100 times in the span of time that it would take you to interact with one potential date in ‘real-life’.
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