Tinder has been nothing less than a cultural phenomenon, adding "swiping" to our dating lexicon. The casual dating app is incredibly straightforward and easy to use. In fact, it's so simple that, at least for the standard free version, there are really only a few things you can do on it, including updating your profile, swiping left (to pass) or right (to like), and chatting with matches.
Being accepted for who you are by your partner is an essential part of building a love that lasts. Of all the online dating sites, it’s important you choose one that allows you to create a profile that aptly captures your personality. It should connect you with people you actually want to be dating and meet your expectations. Ensuring that your dating site meets your security expectations is also essential to the process of online dating. You want to be guaranteed that your data and pictures are safe and secured with confidence.
OkCupid, how you confuse me. I have friends who've met spouses through OkCupid. My last serious relationship came from OkCupid. In fact, I've been on OkCupid, on and off, for roughly the last 11 years. Profiles are much more in-depth than most dating sites, and if you answer a seemingly endless series of questions, they will spit out a reasonable Match/Enemy percentage ratio on profiles to help you gauge compatibility.
No matter what you’re looking for—casual hookups, marriage, polyamory, relationships with men, relationships with women, a little bit of everything—OkCupid can accommodate. Two factors really set OkCupid apart from the competition: It produces the best profiles, and it uses the best matching algorithm that pops the most promising profiles to the top that are more likely to be robust, human, and charming.

Setup is basic: You'll see pictures and short bios of potential matches in your area and can swipe right if you're interested and left if you're not. It's a pretty close mock of Tinder, except for the fact that Bumble relieves the anxiety of accidentally swiping left on a hottie by letting you backtrack.  Bumble also offers a BFF feature to find strictly platonic friends and a LinkedIn-ish networking feature called Bizz in attempts to remind everyone that it's not just a hookup app.


Damien has a "keep it 100" mentality, offering sage wisdom such as, "Money can't buy happiness." He's a designer at a popular clothing company and asks a lot of questions about my job. I answer, but he continues to press on the subject. "How do you know who your consumer is?" he quizzes me. "What kind of data do you use?" Our date starts to feel like an informational interview.
Why it's awesome: It steers clear of fancy features and gives the people what they want: a black and white path to love. It's not the prettiest site you'll ever see, but if you don't care about aesthetics (and don't mind that it's been begging for an update since, like, 2005), you're good to go. Other people don't seem to mind, considering Plenty of Fish stays a tried and true option and has raked in 90 million users over the past 15 or so years. The lengthy questionnaires and profiles are extremely traditional, making it a safe bet for non-millennials (we'd say 30+), divorcees, and single parents who aren't in the mood to mess around. What it lacks in looks it makes up for in stats, so you're guaranteed to never get bored.

You might be wondering which site is best for you, and if you should bother paying for a membership or not. To help answer that question, keep the following in mind: Free sites are geared toward casual daters, while paid sites tend to be for people looking for a serious relationship. Of course, it’s not always that simple, and there are exceptions. But the key to finding the right site (or sites) for you depends on what type of relationship you’re in search of.
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