You only get a seven matches per day, and yes, we know having restricted matches can be a bummer — because having a day where none of your matches are appealing is a definite possibility. But Hinge isn't meant for constant swiping, and everyone I know who uses Hinge has always felt 100% content with the free version. Having endless matches gets overwhelming, and if you're trying to find a genuine connect, there's no point to viciously rushing through every person in a 50 mile radius.


OkCupid has as many downsides as Tinder, and fewer positive ones, with the exception of learning a lot more about your potential dating partners. The interface is extremely clunky and the photos are a little small. You also have to tap on a user’s small image to see a larger version and the person’s profile, which is simply too large for an app. It works on a website, but it’s overkill on an app, and the amount of scrolling required makes it annoying to access. When you exit back to the list, there’s no guarantee that it’ll be in the same order or that it will return you to the spot you scrolled down to, making it extremely hard to keep track of what you’ve already viewed.


The photos are large, the app is — comparatively speaking — svelte, and setting up your profile is pretty painless. Tinder gets an A for its usability. Also, no one can message you unless you have also expressed an interest in them, which means you get no unsolicited messages. While there are a fair few people on Tinder who use it strictly to collect swipes, many people are actually inclined to meet up in real life, which is not always the case with dating apps. Tinder is one of the most popular dating apps too, so you’re more likely to come across someone you like who lives nearby.
Bumble works on a similar basis to Tinder. It's free, easy to set up and simple to use, and a right swipe indicates a like. A key difference, however, is that women have to begin the conversation, thus avoiding the countless cringey messages of Tinder. There's also a 24-hour time limit to start chatting, so if you find your soulmate you'd better move quickly. 
Valentines Day already! I met this boy on @Grindr in 2012. We started dating in 2016. Engaged in 2017. We will be married in a year minus two days. He brings a smile to my face everyday and can’t imagine a world without him. ❤️#successfulonlinedating #Valentines2019 #TrueLoveDay pic.twitter.com/Ezo9OtOWNu
Tinder has been nothing less than a cultural phenomenon, adding "swiping" to our dating lexicon. The casual dating app is incredibly straightforward and easy to use. In fact, it's so simple that, at least for the standard free version, there are really only a few things you can do on it, including updating your profile, swiping left (to pass) or right (to like), and chatting with matches.
Jenna Slater, 27, lives in San Diego and found the entire notion of meeting people online daunting. “Dating apps have always been hard for me because even though I find myself hilarious, that struggles to come across via text,” she says. “I also work insane hours and simple don’t have the time to swipe hoping the person swipes me back.” Tinder was decidedly not for her, and she began to think dating apps in general might be a bust, until she found Hinge.
The downside to this app is it's built-in elitism. It's meant to feel exclusive, and the language used in the marketing materials isn't exactly warm and fuzzy. For example, one of the website's taglines is, "We do the scouting and the vetting, you do the matching and the petting." Still, if an exclusive and upscale dating app experience is what you’re looking for, The League could be for you. 
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