Clover is a little bit like Tinder and a little bit like OKCupid. You can login with your Facebook and then add more information about your appearance and reason for using the app. For example, you can choose from several “intentions” including “looking for dating” or “looking for people to chat with.” Clover uses your location to find you dates in the area, so like most location-based dating apps, it won’t work well if you live in a rural area with a small population. Once you’ve logged in you’re prompted to start a free 7-day trial or sign up for either 3 months or 1 year of service. With a paid membership you can see read receipts on your messages, share photos and videos and get access to advanced filters for your potential matches like income and ethnicity. You can also opt out and just use the free membership if you’d prefer.
Bumble looks eerily similar to Tinder, but functions a tad differently. The big catch with Bumble is that when opposite genders match, the woman must message the guy first — and she has 24 hours to do so. Guys can extend matches for 24 hours, if they’re really hoping to hear from a woman, as can ladies, if they want to initiate something with a match but just haven’t had the time during the first day. For same-gender matches, either person can initiate the conversation first.

MeetMe is another one of those location-based dating apps. It features a simple. colorful interface that's easy to use. It also boasts over 100 million downloads and uses between all the various platforms. Its original intention is to be used as a way to meet people in your area. However, if enough sparks fly, those people can easily become more than just friends. The biggest issue with this one is the fake profiles and it's a fairly serious problem. However, most of these apps have fake profile problems so we're not sure when enough is enough. Still, we recommend this one for patient people and, by all means, if you can't find anything in a few weeks, get rid of it.


It’s very quick and easy to set up and use. The profile creation is pretty standard. You add photos, age, profession, and interests, and you can also specify what you feel like doing, whether that’s taking a walk in the park, seeing a movie, or having a drink. Happn has some nifty integrations — you can use Facebook to set up your profile, hook up your Instagram account to automatically add photos, and add Spotify to see if your musical tastes align.
Now has a messaging feature, but chats are only visible for two hours if you and another user stop talking. You get four free access keys when you sign up, which increase your chances of meeting new people. If you want more, they're available for purchase. When you buy a Gold Key, you get unlimited access to all of the app's premium features for 60 hours.
Another strong option if you're just on the hunt for no-strings-attached action is XMatch. As you'll clearly see if you visit the site, XMatch is all about giving you a taste of the "XXX action." With more than 75 million members, the hookup-centric site will serve up a ton of possible sex partners in your area, whether it's someone who shares your specific kinky desires, or other people also looking for no-strings attached sexy hookups.
Are you tired of finding what looks like that special someone, then having to pay to send him or her a message? Not only does POF let you send notes for free, but it offers helpful tools to make messaging easier and faster. This includes the Spark function, which prompts you to talk about parts of other users' profiles that you find interesting. That said, the interface feels plain and clunky, and serves up ads more often than other services.

As this is 2019, all of these services, even the decades-old Match, offer both iPhone apps and Android Apps, but still have desktop counterparts for when you're at work and want to take a break from your spreadsheet to set up a weekend tryst. (Bumble is the one exception here.) Just be aware that the functionality can vary substantially between the app and desktop interfaces. For example, there's no swiping on Tinder's browser version.
I was on Clover for quite some time but had forgotten it even existed until I started to throw this list together. I felt like it was a less successful hybrid of OkCupid and Tinder, and I also felt like the user base was pretty small, even though I live in an urban area with plenty of people who use a wide variety of dating apps. Clover says it has nearly 6 million users, 85 percent of whom are between the ages of 18 and 30.
Chemistry.com is the sister site to Match.com. Subscribers take a personality test and are matched with other subscribers based on the results. You must determine whether your personality type is “Explorer,” “Negotiator,” “Builder,” or “Director.” It offers more guided support than Match.com by offering activities for matches to get to know one another.
Our Time is yet another site originated by the creators of Match.com, so it is similar in style to that site, as well as Chemistry.com, and uses a matchmaking algorithm to generate matches based on your personality profile. However, like Match, you can choose your own matches, and it also allows searches for same-sex relationships. It costs $19.99 for a one-month subscription, $17.99 per month for a three-month subscription, and $11.99 per month for a six-month subscription.

That might be one reason why Bumble has its devotees, too. “I downloaded Tinder and Bumble when I got out of a pretty catastrophic relationship because I was certain I had extinguished all game and would never meet someone organically,” says Cristina, 26, a graphic designer from Boston. “At first Tinder was the more addictive option because of the number of candidates, but I eventually shifted to Bumble because the conversations were better, and the numbers way more manageable.”
Even free dating websites and apps give you the option to sign up for a premium option, which does in fact cost you. Premium options cost about $10 each month for basic service, or if you want more effective pairing with people you’re more likely to get along with for an average of $40 per month. You could also pay less if you purchase a membership for several months at a time.
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