Part of what draws some people to The League is the ability be extremely picky about the kind of people you want to match with. You can filter not only by age and location, but also by race or even education. Then every day at 5 p.m. you'll get to see five matches and decide whether to like them or not. Each user profile displays photos, location, height, age, education, career and hobbies. If both users like each other, you can strike up a conversation on the app's messaging feature. If you want more than your allotted five matches, you'll need to upgrade your membership, which costs more. The League also hosts events and group hangouts for users who feel more comfortable meeting people that way.
It's not exactly a secret that dating app use among millennials is super common: we use our phones for everything else, so it makes sense that we'd use an app to find a partner or hookup, too. That being said, not all dating apps are created equal, and some are more popular than others — but which one takes the top spot? According to a new survey of 294 singles from Piper Jaffray, Tinder is the most popular dating app among single millennials: 27 percent of millennial respondents said they use Tinder, as opposed to only 12 percent who said they use runner-up Bumble, Yahoo Finance reports.
Why it's awesome: It's the dating app version of the Sadie Hawkins dance, created by ex-Tinder employees (ooh, drama). In an attempt to correct one of the common complaints of dating apps — that women get spammed with tons of creepy messages — women are required to message first with Bumble. It pushes some women out of their comfort zone, but it's a nice change of pace. And if you don't message, you could possibly be un-matching with the love of your life, and that's way worse than being ignored. It also takes the pressure off of dudes who feel like they need to start the conversation every time. (We knew you were gonna ask, so yes, with same-sex matches either party can start things off.) Matches expire after 24 hours so you can't agonize over that opening line for too long, and your match list won't be filled with people you forgot you matched with 57 weeks ago. This tactic is apparently working, as Bumble's founder claims that 60% of matches result in a conversation.
If you want to know more about someone, you can always just ask the friend you have in common, which is a human touch that’s absent from most apps. Moreover, people can message you only if you’ve matched, so there are no unsolicited “greetings”. You can see what sort of relationship people are looking for, and while that doesn’t sound that revolutionary, it reflects the fact that Hinge carries more of a dating expectation than a just-hooking-up expectation à la Tinder. Furthermore, because of the friends-of-friends connection, you’re less likely to run across inappropriate photos. That’s a plus in our book.
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